Tag Archives: writing goals

Google Drive for Writers

driveforwritersToday I want to share with you some elements of the free Google service known as Drive. This is something like a cloud drive (you can backup files) but also an online program suite. I will be discussing mostly the Docs features.

Google Drive includes:

Docs– This is an online word processor that is compatible with Microsoft Office, OpenOffice, and even Microsoft Works.

Sheets– A spreadsheet compatible with Office, Open office, and Works.

Slides – A presentation service that easily integrates into web sites or shared with others. Compatible to open files from Office and OpenOffice.

Forms – A service to create and compile information from forms. Includes easy to use templates, click and build features, and saves data to the drive for access later.

Drawing– This includes an online service to create or edit graphics. Saves as PDF, JPG, SVG, and PNG.

docs

Google Docs works similar to most word processors, including formatting, templates, and printing. You can open and save, change file formats, and share/collaborate with others online. This also includes revision history. (Saved my butt when I ‘lost’ an entire chapter of a book I was writing).

You can also add ‘add-ons’ which improves function;

Table of Contents – Creates a table of contents that runs as a sidebar.

EasyBib- Bibliography creator

Speech Recognition- So you can talk instead of typing. This works great for those who have issues with typing for long periods of time.

Mind mapping- This is a great tool to plot stories or brainstorm ideas.

ProWritingAid- This is not free, but as an add on that works in the Docs. It corrects grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Screenplay formatter- For the script writers out there, this add on helps with formatting your doc.

Saves in these formats:

DOCX – Document Microsoft Word file

ODT – OpenOffice Document Text file

RTF – Rich Text Format, works with any word processor

PDF- Portable Document Format, used for downloading files and eBooks

TXT – Text. Very simple with very little formatting but can be read by every word processor.

HTML/ZIP – Hypertext Markup Language is what web sites are built. Often used to upload to publish books.

EPUB – EBook file format that can be read by tablets and smart phones. This is new and is an industry standard.


Google drive can also

Cloud Storage– Back up photos, documents, etc. to your cloud drive. This includes 15 GB free, and you can pay $1.99 monthly for 100 more GB.

Collaborate with others–  Not only can you share files with others, they can view or even edit them. You can also share LIVE with others. Some authors now share their writing in real time for fans to check out their process. Share via email or link on your blog. You can even embed files too

Share anywhere– Google Drive works on PC, Mac, smart phone, and tablets.

Did you find this helpful? Don’t forget to share, like, and comment to help support this blog.

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Link: 10 Tips to Promote Your Book on Social Media

10tips

10 tips to Promote Your Book with Social Media– very cool ideas. I’m starting an ‘idea notebook’ to copy the tips I want to follow, and take notes on what works or not. This way I can share my own experiences later with my readers.

Not every tip works so well, but you often have to take action and take it again for it to work.

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Story Tropes: Love (Video by Nika Harper)

I decided I’m so bad about posting, Ill start to share interesting videos, articles, and web sites that might interest other writers.

Today’s link by National Novel Writing Month YouTube channel, talks about Story Tropes: Love.

What is a trope?

A literary trope is the use of figurative language – via word, phrase, or even an image – for artistic effect[1] such as using a figure of speech. The word trope has also come to be used for describing commonly recurring literary and rhetorical devices,[2] motifs or clichés in creative works. (wikipedia)

Some writers might consider tropes as cliché’s and should be avoided, but classic story telling often includes tropes because they work so well. They often speak truthfully about the human condition- of characters as well as the readers.

You can look up tons of tropes at TVtropes.org which is searchable by genre, medium, and type.

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NaNoWriMo 2015 Prep

The NaoNoWriMo, known as The National Novel Writing Month, was started in 1999 by Creative writer, Chris Baty. (see No Plot? No Problem!).

If you check out the web site, it explains the basic rules of writing fiction of 50,000 in thirty days in any genre, including fanfiction.

Back in 2007, I completed the National Novel Writing Month challenge. I learned a great deal, however, I’m not sure if I’d dedicate that sort of time again. Grueling, time consuming, I found myself not enjoying the writing process at all. It was much like boot camp; forcing you to write through pain, doubt, and everything else.

But others take on the NaNoWriMo almost every year, and I often suggest writers try it at least once for the experience, to see what you learn about yourself. Even if you fail to reach the 50,000 words in 30 days challenge, you still gain insight into yourself.

My tips:

  • Get writing done early in the day. I set my time for this because if things come up, you still have the rest of the day to make up the word count.
  • Get friends and family on board. My first time, I ended up friending someone who ended up teasing me when I fell behind- DO NOT DO THAT. You want a support system, not naysayers or competition. You want encouragement, not someone to cut you down.
  • Have your plot and characters planned out before November 1. In 2011, I tried NaNoWriMo but had nothing planned and quit a week into it. It was too stretched between ideas and plot changes to accomplish much. Have the most basic of conflict>climax>resolution outlined.
  • Don’t beat yourself up if you miss a day. You can make up the word count on a weekend or tacking on writing time throughout the week.
  • Even if you don’t reach the 50,000, the process can still prove valuable as a learning tool, as well giving you a block of writing you can edit later.

Post in comments your own experience with the NaNoWriMo, if you plan to join this year, or questions/comments about it. Winking smile

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