Tag Archives: character

Writer blog fun

Writing Blog FunThe other day, my writer’s group talked about blogging for writers. Authors, or would-be authors, should consider this medium as a means for marketing their writing. However, it also provides a wonderful means to exercise your writing (or show off your mad skillz) to the world.

Some writers ask me “But what would I write about?” My response is often “You’re a writer- MAKE S#!& UP!” So here are a few blogs to illustrate my point;

 

garThe Evil Overlord Handbook is by Gar the Pitiless. The author writes as an evil character, but unfortunately, doesn’t write much now. His posts are incredibly entertaining and well worth the read.

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The British, modern day series of Sherlock also boasts not just Sherlock’s Blog, but also of Dr. Watson.

From the show, the characters talk about their blogs, which include the posts they mention. Even the side character, Molly Hooper, has a blog.

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I once wrote a blog (no longer published) from the viewpoint of a housewife by day, secret agent at night. I even created a villain, Kang Fang of the Nepal Mafia who sought to take over the world. Since I didn’t gain too many readers, I ended up not writing posts in favor of other projects. But it was fun.

A fellow writer who enjoyed my fan fiction wrote me and volunteered to play the role of Kang Fang. We even explored writing a shared story, taking turns with scenes between two agents. It was hilarious fun for us.

Even if you don’t wish to explore the fictional world. a non-fiction author can utilize their blog to write about the topic of their books. This helps build trust for readers.

For example, if you write about gardening, you might blog about gardening techniques, or share tips. If you write about health, you could post about medical conditions, new discoveries in health, or share personal stories about health on your blog.

The important takeaway is that a blog provides you a valuable and fun tool to gain readership through your writing skills. Show off your writing skills and let your imagination run wild.

 

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Story Tropes: Love (Video by Nika Harper)

I decided I’m so bad about posting, Ill start to share interesting videos, articles, and web sites that might interest other writers.

Today’s link by National Novel Writing Month YouTube channel, talks about Story Tropes: Love.

What is a trope?

A literary trope is the use of figurative language – via word, phrase, or even an image – for artistic effect[1] such as using a figure of speech. The word trope has also come to be used for describing commonly recurring literary and rhetorical devices,[2] motifs or clichés in creative works. (wikipedia)

Some writers might consider tropes as cliché’s and should be avoided, but classic story telling often includes tropes because they work so well. They often speak truthfully about the human condition- of characters as well as the readers.

You can look up tons of tropes at TVtropes.org which is searchable by genre, medium, and type.

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Thoughts on the adventure

thoughtsThis year I promised myself to go beyond my comfort zone, or more importantly, what I considered ‘safe’, to embrace the adventure and see where it took me.

It didn’t work out as well as I hoped.

Taking chances includes disasters. You don’t read about the people who didn’t make it. Failing doesn’t make good storytelling, but it is part of the path towards success, to find out what works and what doesn’t work. (And I excel at finding out what doesn’t work).

Get help. Help takes on many forms, not just the help of other people who know what they are doing, but also the encounters with choices, or finding meaning in anything from a quote to a story. Ask for advice, weed out the unhelpful criticism, and move forward.

Rise from the ashes. This is difficult if you don’t have wings, so even if you have to stagger and stumble out of the ashes, that works too. The important thing is that you keep trying, changing your plans if necessary, in order to keep moving forward.

I wish Life was more like a story, where you encounter the Hero’s Journey, where stumbling is only a setback, where you find a the Guide to help you, and where you may not triumph but you do change for the better.

What are your thoughts on this topic; post in comments.

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Evocative Writing Tips

SnowfairyOne of the more enjoyable elements of reading a good story is feeling the stirrings of emotion. As a reader, I can cheer or boo the characters, but also sympathize and relate to what they endure in the story.

Words are powerful; they can incite rage, deep thought, even provoke tears. They can change minds, influence beliefs, and take the reader into another realm, letting them live another life, and leave them wanting for more.

But how to get that into your words? Here are some tips;

Ask yourself, what makes you feel? It is the human condition that touches the reader, letting them know they are not alone in the world, that the storyteller, the characters, share their emotion and reactions.

By writing things that we can all relate, touches upon the fact we are social creatures, needing one another, but also empathizing with others. We might not share the same intensity, or respond the same, but feelings of loss, love, anger, jealousy, etc are very universal.

Show, don’t tell. You can’t tell the reader what the character is feeling, and you won’t have to; the situations, conflict, and influences from other characters should be more than enough to help ‘show’ the high emotions of any scene.

A good example is sharing what a character behaves with that emotion, not the emotion itself. Someone feeling grief might range from dissociative feelings to anger, denial, or even a sense of disbelief. Fear takes the form of biting nails, tugging hair, or feeling sick. Rage takes shape in anything from breaking things to dead silence.

Use style to shift mood and pace. Short sentences are best for fights, but scenes that build relationship often require more detail, with sentences of length.

Direct, to the point, style of writing works best in scenes you want to move quickly, to add a sense of tension, or the shift a character who realizes how to solve the conflict. Flowery detail can paint description, illustrate deeper emotion, or share the innermost thoughts of a character.

The highest form of flattery is when a reader expresses how a story made them feel. I’ve had readers tell me how much they cared for the characters, or even how angry they became with certain scenes.

What stories made you feel? Have you ever cried when reading a story? Post in comments. I’d love to hear from you.

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