Online Author Platform

Building an online platform is basically your online precise as an author. Agents and publishers will look you up on the Internet, and you must consider what impression you present as an authority and your following.

The challenging I found was to find branding for myself. As a flake creative person, I tend to want too many things, change things too much, and scatter myself too thin online. I try too many hats, as it were. This leaves me muddled and ineffective with goals

This year, I’m learning to focus (which is a Herculean endeavor) to brand myself as a writer, graphic artist, and web designer.

I hope the following links will help others to streamline their author platform building;

The 6 Components of an Online Author Platform

This is an excerpt of a lengthier tutorial on components of an online author platform. Even the 4 minutes or so provides some insight, and gives you a taste of what the full tutorial offers. ($16.99 for this video tutorial or $16.58 to subscribe per month to all Writer’s Digest library of tutorials)

Or view this Google Hangout (1 hr. long) discussing the Author Platform. (free)

author platform

What do you find the most challenging in building your author platform? Do you have a website? Blog? Social sites? Do you find them effective? Post in comments your thoughts.

Leave a comment

Filed under Marketing, Publishing, Writer

Tip: MS Word- insert copyright symbol

Copyright

And why should you know this tip? Writers often ask me how to add copyright when they start sharing their writing online. Know that as soon as you put your writing to paper, it is copyrighted automatically but it’s proving that you own the writing will come into question.

Could someone still steal your work? Yes, they can, but keep files of your work, and take care to who you share.

My writer’s group often share our work and in the ten years of sharing, no one has plagiarized someone else’s work.

WordPress Tags: , , , ,

Leave a comment

Filed under tip, Writer

How to share your writing (online)

How to Share Your Writing- aWritersJourney.netAs an organizer of a writer’s group, over the years we’ve tried various methods with sharing our writing via the Internet. I decided to share the various hiccups and methods we’ve used.

For starters, you need to understand the basics of saving files and the methods of adding notes.

File formats:

The file format of a document is the type of file created in a program. DOC and DOCX are created by Microsoft Word, while OpenOffice creates ODT and MS Works creates WKS.

RTF DOC DOCX
WPS ODT TXT
PDF WPD EPUB
HTML MOBI

Word Processor formats explained.

To share files, RTF is the most basic of file formats that can be opened by every word processor. It strips formatting, however, so be warned about that. You can also add a tutorial of using a free service like Google Drive documents to view the document.

Asking for feedback can offer the writer a harrowing amount of worry, but ideally the feedback can provide valuable insight on improving the writing. I think it depends on the reader, since some folks don’t like genres, you should pick readers who enjoy the type of story.


How to share:

Email is one of the better methods of sending out your work. This is done by attaching the file. The recipient will open, read, and can add notes, then send it back to you.

Using a Cloud Drive is another method, but the biggest drawback is some Cloud Drives want the sender and the receiver to both have accounts. I’ve picked ones I’ve used and no not require the recipient to be a member:

googledriveI’ve used Google Drive in the past, where I upload the file to the drive, and can then share with a link. Readers view in their browser, can add notes, and you can see who read and did what on the document. Unlike some drives, the recipient doesn’t need a Google membership, but they will show up as ‘anonymous’.

dropboxDropbox and Onedrive both provide a means to save (and backup) files which syncs with a web site service. You can send a link to share a onedrivefile or an entire folder. Both of these drives provide non-members a means to view, add notes, and edit.


Some tips:

Make sure your writing includes your name and email. This enables the reader to email their feedback if you choose sharing via email. You can post in header/footer. If you print it out, make sure you have numbered pages.

Ask what you’d like in the feedback. This can include clarity with character development, plot, setting, and even grammar (although correcting grammar & punctuation is the last edit).

Get a number of opinions. And they will vary. If feedback ends up complaining about the same thing, definitely consider changing. If one person says to remove this, yet another says its fine, then you, as the author, can decide if it stays or if it goes. Even then, if you’re really attached to something in the writing, keep it. You’re the writer, after all.

Value the bad as well as the good. A good beta reader will share what they liked and what they didn’t like. Authors need to know as much as what they’re doing right as what they’re doing wrong.

Don’t let a bad review stop you from writing. Writing is a skill that develops and grows with practice. You can get better. Read more. Write more. Practice, practice, practice. You will get there.

Remember to thank the reader, even if they didn’t like it. Reading your stuff takes their time and it is generous if they’ve taken that time to give you feedback. Not all writing can be their cup of tea.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under The Writer's Journey, tip, Writer

Writer blog fun

Writing Blog FunThe other day, my writer’s group talked about blogging for writers. Authors, or would-be authors, should consider this medium as a means for marketing their writing. However, it also provides a wonderful means to exercise your writing (or show off your mad skillz) to the world.

Some writers ask me “But what would I write about?” My response is often “You’re a writer- MAKE S#!& UP!” So here are a few blogs to illustrate my point;

 

garThe Evil Overlord Handbook is by Gar the Pitiless. The author writes as an evil character, but unfortunately, doesn’t write much now. His posts are incredibly entertaining and well worth the read.

—-

The British, modern day series of Sherlock also boasts not just Sherlock’s Blog, but also of Dr. Watson.

From the show, the characters talk about their blogs, which include the posts they mention. Even the side character, Molly Hooper, has a blog.

—-

I once wrote a blog (no longer published) from the viewpoint of a housewife by day, secret agent at night. I even created a villain, Kang Fang of the Nepal Mafia who sought to take over the world. Since I didn’t gain too many readers, I ended up not writing posts in favor of other projects. But it was fun.

A fellow writer who enjoyed my fan fiction wrote me and volunteered to play the role of Kang Fang. We even explored writing a shared story, taking turns with scenes between two agents. It was hilarious fun for us.

Even if you don’t wish to explore the fictional world. a non-fiction author can utilize their blog to write about the topic of their books. This helps build trust for readers.

For example, if you write about gardening, you might blog about gardening techniques, or share tips. If you write about health, you could post about medical conditions, new discoveries in health, or share personal stories about health on your blog.

The important takeaway is that a blog provides you a valuable and fun tool to gain readership through your writing skills. Show off your writing skills and let your imagination run wild.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Blog, tip